Projects

The list below contains examples of the projects and pilot measures implemented by GIZ in partner countries as part of Sport for Development.

Pilot measures within the Sport for Development sectoral project

MORE CLOSE

Namibia

Strengthening the position of girls and women in Namibia in and through sport

Adolescents playing soccer. Copyright GIZ
Copyright GIZ
Commissioned by: German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)
Country: Namibia
Local partner: Namibian Football Association
Overall term: Mid 2013 to end of 2015

Context
The Namibian Football Association (NFA) and German organisations have for some years been using sports to achieve a range of development goals in Namibia. These organisations include the NFA itself, GIZ, ‘Youth Development through Football’, and the German Football Association (DFB). All these bodies see sport as an opportunity to develop both individuals and society as a whole, believing that when it is used appropriately, sport can obtain results that go far beyond the acquisition of physical skills.

In common with many developing countries, Namibia faces a wide gulf between rich and poor. Social status is crucially dependent on educational level. Girls and young women often have only limited opportunities for social advancement. They are frequently exposed to extreme violence and, as a result, are more likely to become infected with HIV/AIDS. If we are to reduce these social disparities and hardships, new approaches are needed; sport can deliver these.

Objective
The project has a number of objectives. It is designed to improve the position of girls and young women in Namibian society. Specific sports teaching programmes, combined with measures to prevent violence, boost their self-confidence and strengthen their bodies. Sport is also used to provide access to education and training opportunities that have so far been unavailable to girls, opening up new employment prospects.

Our approach
There are two parts to the project. The first focuses on developing a sports teaching programme for girls and young women. The second involves construction of a community centre and refuge on the premises of the local partner, the Namibian Football Association (NFA). This will provide girls with a safe and anxiety-free environment in which they can play sport, socialise and develop. The project is to launch initially in Windhoek, but it will later be rolled out to other areas of Namibia. An academic institution will support the project and evaluate its results.

Results achieved so far
The pilot programme was launched in mid-2013 and is still in the development phase. It is being implemented on behalf of BMZ in close cooperation with the German Football Association (DFB), the Football and Athletics Association of Westphalia (FLVW) and the Namibian Football Association (NFA) as core partners. Namibia’s Ministry of Youth, National Service, Sport and Culture (MYNSSC) is also expected to become involved.

MORE CLOSE

Brazil

Promoting high-quality sports provision in poor areas in Brazil

Children playing soccer on the street. Copyright GIZ
Copyright GIZ
Commissioned by: German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)
Country: Brazil
Lead executing agency: Agência Brasileira de Cooperação (ABC)
Overall term: January 2013 to December 2015

Background
Over the next few years, Brazil is hosting two of the world’s major sporting events: the football World Cup in 2014 and the Olympic and Paralympic summer games in Rio de Janeiro in 2016. These events will put Brazil in the international spotlight. As in many emerging economies, the gulf between rich and poor in Brazil is very wide. Those with low levels of education generally have few opportunities for social advancement, but social disadvantage means significantly fewer opportunities for education. Innovative measures are needed to redress this inequality and break the cycle. Sport is one way this can be done, but little use has so far been made of sport, particularly in poor areas.

Objective
Football coaches are trained in cooperation with local partners, before going on to provide high-quality sports coaching, particularly in schools in disadvantaged residential areas and on a public access basis, as well as within mainstream teaching.

Approach
Building on experiences from Germany, South Africa and Ukraine, our approach is to develop training programmes in Brazil that will complement the existing development programme ‘Football for Development’. In partnership with the NGO ‘Bola pra Frente’, coaches and teachers will then be trained in various regions of the country. Given the proximity of the 2014 World Cup, the programme initially focuses on football, but it could also be adapted to include other sports. The measure is targeted predominantly at girls.

Results – what we have achieved
A German Football Association (DFB) expert has been seconded to Rio de Janeiro as a development advisor. He began working with ‘Bola pra Frente’ in late September 2013. ‘Bola pra Frente’ is receiving a grant to appoint a further local expert. A small NGO based very close to the Maracanã stadium is also being supported to appoint local staff to organise regional football tournaments and fund modest reorganisation measures.

MORE CLOSE

Afghanistan

Promoting girls and young women through sport and sports coaching in schools

Girls and boys playing soccer. Copyright GIZ
Copyright GIZ
Commissioned by: German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)
Country: Afghanistan
Local partner: Afghan Football Association
Overall term: End of 2013 to end of 2015

Context
For more than 30 years, Afghanistan has been marked by armed conflict and ethnic tensions. The country’s priorities include in particular a better level of education and protection for the rights of young women. Sport can play a major part here. The everyday lives of girls and young women both in and outside school have so far offered little scope for regular physical activity. There are few, if any, female sports teachers, and the rare exceptions lack appropriate training and skills. Nevertheless, Afghans are hugely enthusiastic about sport, particularly football and volleyball. Girls are also allowed to play these sports under certain conditions, for example with female coaches. Afghanistan is the first Asian country in which GIZ is implementing a pilot measure as part of the Sport for Development programme. Working within an Islamic culture brings particular challenges.

Objective
In close cooperation with the German Football Association (DFB), national sports bodies and the Afghan Ministry of Education, female teachers are trained to use their skills to teach sport in schools.

Approach
Initially, GIZ is working with the DFB, the Afghan Football Association and the sports division of the Afghan Ministry of Education to develop a model for promoting school sports in the country. This model is being piloted in a small number of schools in the northern provinces and in one or two schools in the capital Kabul. The aim is to bring about a major improvement in sports provision in these schools. Support materials for the Sport for Development programme are also being designed and published. If the pilot measure is successful, it can rapidly be rolled out to other parts of the country.