Fighting and preventing cardiovascular diseases in Ghana

Project description

Title: Ghana Heart Initiative (GHI)
Commissioned by: Bayer AG
Financier:  Bayer AG
Country: Ghana
Lead executing agency: Ministry of Health Ghana; Ghana Health Service
Overall term: 2018 - 2023

A nurse measures the blood pressure of a patient in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. ©Mateo Garcia Prieto, GIZ

Context

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a rapidly increasing health challenge in Ghana and have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke, for example, is one of the most common causes of death in the country’s adult population. Early diagnosis, adequate treatment and close monitoring can reduce the fatal consequences of cardiovascular disease. However, the public health care system of Ghana faces a critical shortage of resources and capacities, seriously hindering an effective response to this mounting CVD burden. There is a lack of national guidelines, medical equipment and specially qualified health professionals for the risk assessment and management of cardiovascular diseases.

Objective

The prevention, diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases is improving in Ghana’s public healthcare system. 

A doctor examines a patient in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana.  ©Mateo Garcia Prieto, GIZ

Approach

The project activities focus on the following:

  • Developing national treatment guidelines and associated app and training manuals for cardiovascular disease management in cooperation with the Ghana Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service
  • Training health professionals in the prevention, diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases
  • Improving national data management and equipment in healthcare facilities and establishing a Support & Call Centre for risk assessment and management of cardiovascular diseases

Last update: March 2022

	Doctors at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana, looking at  a computed tomography image and discussing whether there are signs indicating that the patient suffers from a stroke.  ©Mateo Garcia Prieto, GIZ