Chilean-German Projects within the Scope of the Regional Fund for the Promotion of Triangular Cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean

Project description

Title: Chilean-German Projects within the Scope of the Regional Fund for the Promotion of Triangular Cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean
Commissioned by: German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)
Countries: Chile and third countries in Latin America and the Caribbean
Lead executing agency: Agencia de Cooperación Internacional (AGCI); cooperation agencies in various third countries
Overall term: 2010 to 2016

Context

As an emerging economy, Chile is currently transitioning from a recipient to a donor country. Now that Chile has become of a member of the OECD, it is seeking to engage in new forms of international cooperation. Financed by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) through the Regional Fund for the Promotion of Triangular Cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean, Chile and Germany are jointly implementing development projects in Latin America. GIZ’s direct cooperation partner on the Chilean side is the Agencia de Cooperación Internacional (AGCI), Chile’s government agency for international cooperation. A total of four projects have reached successful completion since the Fund was launched. Five other projects are still running. Using resources from the Fund, Germany and Chile have worked together in the following partner countries: Colombia, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras and Paraguay

Objective

Selected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have worked with Germany to implement successful development measures in third countries.

Results

In the Dominican Republic, Chile and Germany are promoting employment opportunities for young people in marginalised rural and urban areas. To date, this has involved training a total of 80 lecturers and instructors at various basic and further training centres across the country. Applying the new methods and the knowledge they have gained, these lecturers have gone on to teach some 900 young people. More than 800 course participants have drawn up self-employment project proposals, and nearly half of those completing a course have been able to find a job – either with a company or working for themselves – thanks to the supported measures. Some 40 basic and further training centres have incorporated the youth-promotion methods and topics disseminated by the project into their respective syllabuses.

In Paraguay a joint project is helping public authority staff to improve service delivery at local level. To this end, the project partners have devised a management model that ensures more efficient application of social policy while raising the quality of social services by improving coordination between the institutions involved. The focus is on child and youth protection services as well as social housing. The model is one of the central instruments deployed by Paraguay in the fight against poverty. For the first time, the responsible authorities have put together a nationwide plan for designing and implementing the country’s housing policy. Among other things, this plan is used as a basis for assessing housing needs and determining the volume of public investment required.

In Honduras the project partners helped to improve solid waste management. As part of the project, they compiled a manual for managing dumps and landfills which also provided a basis for designing and rolling out training courses for various institutions and municipalities. Both the manual and the training courses take conditions in Honduras into account. The country’s Secretariat of Natural Resources and Environment (SERNA) uses the manual nationwide.

In Colombia, where the focus was on hazardous waste management, the partners assisted Colombia’s Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development (MADS) in setting up and rolling out a monitoring system. This system makes for more effective waste management by enabling authorities to keep a better eye on the producers of hazardous waste as well as on the transport and final disposal of these waste products. Furthermore, studies have been conducted on extended producer responsibility (EPR), eco-toxicity testing and handling hazardous waste in hospitals, all of which have helped both Chilean and Colombian ministries to draft policies.