Nan Tint Tint Khaing, vocational school teacher from Myanmar

Nan Tint Tint Khaing, vocational school teacher from Myanmar

Nan Tint Tint Khaing is an electrical-engineering instructor in Myanmar. Cut off from the outside world for many decades, the country is now slowly starting to open up, giving Khaing the opportunity to update her knowledge and so improve the training she gives her students. On behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and building on its earlier efforts in the field of vocational training in Myanmar, GIZ has been helping to train vocational school teachers in the country since 2012. It also offers training courses in Germany.

Did you always want to go into teaching?
Actually, when I was a child, I wanted to be an engineer. But instead of that I studied maths and went on to work in a state-owned company. I was then moved to a different position and started to work as a trainer. I’ve now been teaching electrical engineering at the vocational training centre in Sinde for 15 years. Even though it was often difficult, due to the fact that I did not have any teacher training at all, I have come to love my work.

Myanmar now has a civil government again. What does that mean for you?
In Myanmar we hardly had any dealings with the outside world. Now that our country has opened its doors to the world once more, the government is looking ahead and wants Myanmar to become competitive again. This means we need better qualified professionals and people who can train them. That’s the reason we teachers were sent to Erfurt to undergo further training. I am really happy that I can help my country move forward in this way.

What did the eight-week course at the vocational training centre in Erfurt do for you?
My colleagues and I underwent intensive training in teaching methodology and didactics. We worked on a teaching concept with the trainers in Erfurt which we now use at our school. Before I had the feeling I had to teach myself everything. Now I believe that a lot will change.

What are you taking back to Myanmar with you from your stay in Germany?
I have seen the progress in Germany and I think it’s really worth emulating. The streets are clean virtually everywhere and lovely flowers and plants grow in people's front gardens. For me that’s a sign of people’s gentleness. I’ll gladly take home the high value Germany places on environmental protection and safety in the workplace.

What is the most important thing in your life?
Time: When I was young, schools and universities were often closed due to political unrest. This stopped me from continuing my studies and finding my dream job. You can’t turn back time.

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    Nan Tint Tint Khaing is a vocational school teacher in a training centre in Myanmar. In autumn 2014 she took part in an eight-week training course in Germany.
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    Training at the Academy for International Cooperation (AIZ) took place in cooperation with the vocational training centre run by Erfurt’s Chamber of Industry and Commerce.
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    ‘It’s the first time I have had the chance to take part in further training like this and to travel outside my home country,' says the 41-year-old Burmese trainer.
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    The further training programme is divided up into theory and practice. The focus is on electric circuits, concrete technical exercises, didactics and methodology.
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    In the classroom, the teachers from Myanmar go through the concept of practice-oriented teaching with their mentor from the vocational training centre in Erfurt.
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    ‘In my 15 years at the vocational training centre in Myanmar I have had to teach myself a lot. I didn’t have any teaching skills,’ she says.
  • GuG > Myanmar > Image7
    Sometimes Khaing, nicknamed ‘Ni La’, was so frustrated that she wanted to give up. Now that, Myanmar is opening up, she has no doubt things are set to move forward.
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    In Erfurt the vocational training teachers developed a teaching concept they will apply in Myanmar with their students.
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    ‘I love my profession,’ says Ni-La. And yet she did not always want to become a teacher.
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    On Erfurt’s Krämer bridge. ‘I like looking at the lovely things in the shop windows. Germany is a very progressive country.’



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